Ferentz scoffs at Huskers’ gripe over Iowa claps

  • ESPN staff writer
  • Joined ESPN in 2011
  • Graduated from Central Michigan

Iowa football coach Kirk Ferentz took issue with Nebraska attributing center Cameron Jurgens’ snapping issues during Friday’s game to clapping from the Hawkeyes’ sideline.

After the Cornhuskers’ 26-20 road loss on Saturday, Nebraska coach Scott Frost was asked about Jurgens, who had five snaps go awry in the first half. Frost told media members he believed clapping from Iowa’s sideline was confusing his center and causing mishandled snaps.

“The issue with snaps today, I don’t think had anything to do with [Jurgens’] technique,” Frost said. “There was clapping going on on their sideline and Cam heard that clap and thought it was the quarterback clapping. We discussed it with the officials, and it didn’t happen in the second half.”

Ferentz was made aware of Frost’s comments during his postgame news conference.

“Never heard of that,” Ferentz said. “If a player was on the field doing it, I get that. But what are we talking about? The next thing you know, we’re going to be treating this like golf. I was going to say tennis, but they do that at tennis. At golf, nobody is able to say anything, right?”

Ferentz said he believed the clapping Frost was referencing was from when he and his coaches were encouraging their players from the sideline. He said there was no malicious intent to deceive. The officials spoke to Ferentz about it at halftime, but he said he believes it was simply the coaches cheering on his team.

Ferentz went on to take a jab at Nebraska, saying he thought the Huskers had a “clap routine” for third downs on the other sideline.

There were no penalties or repercussions during the game for the clapping, but Ferentz continued asking why it was still an issue after the game.

“We should just go home right now. What are we talking about?” Ferentz said. “It’s football, right? It’s football. Are they OK with how I dressed today? Should I be changing my pants, different shirt? What are we talking about?”

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