MotoGP legend Valentino Rossi will ‘refuse to call it quits’ and keep on riding

MotoGP legend Valentino Rossi will keep pushing through the pain, says ex-Ducati ace Neil Hodgson.

The Yamaha superstar is still going strong despite being 41 years old.

He rolled back the years in Jerez last time out with an impressive podium finish.

And Rossi will be eyeing another strong showing in the Czech Republic this weekend as he looks to silence the doubters again.

BT Sport pundit Hodgson says the Italian just refuses to give up.

"He does it because he's addicted to racing," he said.

"To still be willing to smash yourself up – and push through the heat like he did in Spain – most riders simply don't want that.

"Rossi's just bizarre. For most motorcycle riders, if you get to MotoGP you've already achieved so much.

"But then remember the sheer amount of podiums he's got. The figures blow you away.

"We all know he won't be a title contender, but everyone would love to see him win another race.

"To see him on a podium now is like a victory. He shouldn't be able to do it at that age.

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"I was dreading him finishing between 10th and 15th, you never want to see a hero suffer like that.

"But he keeps digging deep and keeps fighting."

Reigning world champion Marc Marquez won't race this weekend following another operation on his broken arm.

That gives Fabio Quartararo an opportunity to extend his lead at the top of the standings.

The Frenchman has now won the first two races of the new campaign.

Hodgson says the Petronas Yamaha ace is firmly on the right track.

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  • "People were talking about him when he was 13 years old," he explained.

    "But when he came on the world stage he made some silly mistakes and bad decisions with teams.

    "He was attracted by money and his father made difficult calls because they had next to nothing.

    "He went into worse teams – not better teams – and started to lose confidence for the first time in his career.

    "But when he got to MotoGP he's excelled. Clearly the Yamaha suits him, he's a corner speed type of rider.

    "What I'm hoping is that he's now building confidence and self belief."

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