Burnley's Dyche would 'enjoy the challenge' of managing a bigger club

Sean Dyche would ‘enjoy the challenge’ of managing a bigger club as he insists he would not be intimidated by the pressure because he has to deliver for THREE HUNDRED people at Burnley whose jobs rely on their Premier League status

  • Burnley boss Sean Dyche is the Premier League’s longest-serving manager 
  • He meets Thomas Tuchel, the eighth Chelsea boss since his arrival at Turf Moor
  • Dyche insists he understands the demands of working for a Roman Abramovich 
  • But he says he has an even wider responsibility than challenging for trophies

While Chelsea managers live in fear of saving their own jobs, Burnley boss Sean Dyche has the futures of three hundred people to worry about at Turf Moor.

He believes having those experiences mean he wouldn’t be intimidated by moving to a bigger club even if the casualty rate is high – as Frank Lampard discovered last week.

Dyche, the Premier League’s longest-serving manager, meets newest recruit Thomas Tuchel, the eighth Chelsea manager since his own arrival at Turf Moor in October 2012.

Sean Dyche insists he would not be intimidated by the challenge of managing a bigger club

Dyche insists he has the futures of three hundred people to worry about at Turf Moor

While understanding the demands of working for Roman Abramovich, Dyche says clubs like Burnley give managers even wider responsibility than challenging for trophies.

‘It depends how you define pressure. We have office staff, playing staff, all with contracts that radically change if you are not in the Premier League,’ he says.

‘That is an in-house pressure in itself – I have to deliver on behalf of them. I wouldn’t imagine it’s the same at Chelsea.

Dyche, the Premier League’s longest-serving managers, meets newest recruit Thomas Tuchel

‘I factor in the welfare of people here. From where this club has come from to where it is now, there are hundreds of people who are more than happy with what they’ve gained; the kudos of being in the Premier League and their own development.’

Burnley have been promoted twice into the top flight under Dyche and now have 296 full-time and part-time staff including 54 first-team players and coaches.

Having played in Europe under Dyche, The Clarets have bounced back from a slow start to this season with successive wins against Liverpool and Aston Villa in the last 10 days.

Though Dyche has been linked with other jobs, he’s not received a firm offer for his services.

Burnley have 296 full-time and part-time staff including 54 first-team players and coaches

‘If a challenge comes my way that’s bigger on paper and I wanted to do it and they wanted me to do it, I’d listen, learn and take it on,’ he says.

‘If you said to me at some point would I enjoy the challenge of trying to manage what would be deemed a bigger club, of course.

‘It’s a natural progression but I am not running there or forcing it. I am making sure this club is in good shape because that’s my job.’

Dyche considers career ambitions as purely theoretical without opportunities.

The Clarets have bounced back from a slow start with wins against Liverpool and Aston Villa

‘Doors have to open,’ he says. ‘My life hasn’t been by clear design. I was youth team manager at Watford and enjoyed that. A door opened as assistant manager, then manager. Then I got the sack and another door opened to be manager.

‘People think it’s all been plain-sailing at Burnley. I got booed off for the first seven or eight months so I have had my fair share of question marks.

‘You can confuse yourself with too many thoughts about this industry. Football is not a straight line in my experience. I speak to people in business about going up then ladder. In football, you can be a top manager and a bottom manager within a season. I have never taken it for granted.’




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